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How we do it & why...

We are similar to bulk wholefood stores. We offer convenience that doesn't cost the earth! Order online & find us every second Sunday at Growers Green Farmers Market in Beaconsfield, Perth WA. We want to make it easy for you to shop zero waste and save your precious time, so we repurpose jars and containers and fill to a variety of weights, ready to go. You can return these jars and the labels to us for reuse. We aim for zero waste and document our waste on Instagram and Facebook.

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Quality Bulk Wholefoods

We have sourced a select bunch of staple quality bulk wholefoods that meet our sustainability criteria - the rrrrrr's. We prefer organic and therefore chemical free!

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Stored Airtight

To maintain freshness.

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We Tare The Jar

We REPURPOSE donated jars (after we have thoroughly cleaned them!) and you only pay for the contents!

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We Fill The Jar

To keep things hygienic, staff fill the jars. 

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Final Weigh

The final contents of the jar are weighed and tagged. You can return jars & labels to us for REUSE!

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Delivery or pick up?

At checkout, select delivery or pick up from us in Leeming, Growers Green Farmers Market or one of our volunteer hosts. 

See FAQ for delivery & pick up days to your suburb in Perth.

Return your jars, labels & delivery box for REUSE! Boomerang jars & labels!!

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REUSE

Hundreds of labels and jars have already been returned, like a mini circular economy!

For more info see FAQ.

 

Why we do it...

"...by 2050 oceans are expected to contain more plastics than fish, and the entire plastics industry will consume 20% of total oil production, and 15% of the annual carbon budget".

[www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org]

We do what we do because we are passionate about sustainability and would like to be part of the solution:)

Join us in a greener way to shop your staple pantry items and bulk refill cleaning products.

 
 
The 5 subtropical Gyres. Image credit:  https://www.5gyres.org/faq/   Have you heard of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch? There are huge collections of litter in the ocean (mainly plastic) that are carried there by 5 subtropical Gyres (as pictured.)  The term “patch” is misleading. The pieces of plastic are not all floating bottles, bags and buoys, but include tiny pieces of plastic resembling confetti, making them almost impossible to clean up.

The 5 subtropical Gyres. Image credit: https://www.5gyres.org/faq/

Have you heard of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch? There are huge collections of litter in the ocean (mainly plastic) that are carried there by 5 subtropical Gyres (as pictured.)

The term “patch” is misleading. The pieces of plastic are not all floating bottles, bags and buoys, but include tiny pieces of plastic resembling confetti, making them almost impossible to clean up.

What's wrong with plastic?

A huge amount of plastic pollution is due to food packaging. Just think about the aisles in a supermarket. How many products (fresh and processed) are wrapped in some sort of plastic packaging?

As of 2015, an estimated 6300 metric tons of plastic has been produced and only 9% of that was recycled. 12% was incinerated and 79% accumulated in landfills or the natural environment. [www.advances.sciencemag.org]

The problem is every piece of plastic ever made still exists. It never really goes away. It simply degrades into smaller pieces and pollutes our oceans, waterways, soil and enters the food chain. And the production of plastic uses finite resources such as coal, natural gas, minerals, plants, water and crude oil. When plastic is incinerated highly toxic dioxins are released.

 What is made from recycled plastic?

Currently plastic isn't really recycled. A more accurate term is down-cycled. These are some examples of what plastic is currently recycled into: wheelie bins, outdoor furniture, timber substitute planking used in jetties and walking tracks, pipes, mud flaps, traffic calming equipment, water meter covers, pots for plants, crates, pallets, garden edging, bags, worm farms and compost bins.

Not really a solution is it? A better solution is to REFUSE & REDUCE plastic in the first place:)

 

 
80% of plastic in our ocean comes from land

80% of plastic in our ocean comes from land

How does plastic pollution end up in the ocean?

1. Marine activities (shipping, fishing, illegal dumping); and

2. From land. Around 80% of plastics in the ocean comes from land.

a. From countries with no infrastructure to manage recycling waste (in Australia a lot of recycling is sent off shore so we contribute); 

b. Single use plastics e.g. bottles, plastic cutlery, bags, straws etc end up in our rivers and oceans from sewerage overflow, or because of their light weight, they can blow into our drains and rivers;

c. Micro plastics - these can come from a variety of sources including larger plastic pieces that have broken apart, resin pellets used for plastic manufacturing, or in the form of microbeads, which are minute plastic beads used in health and beauty products.

(www.5gyres.org)

d. Micro fibres - Choice reports: "One cycle of a 6kg load of acrylic clothing or textiles (such as yoga pants, fleece jackets, acrylic onesies, running shorts and microfibre cleaning cloths) in a washing machine could result in over 700,000 plastic microfilaments being shed, according to another study at Plymouth University."

All clothing items – including cotton and wool – shed microfibres when washed, but the natural fibres biodegrade. Synthetic particles are resistant to degradation, are slow to break down and are capable of absorbing toxins.

Ecologist Mark Browne from University College Dublin studied sediment along shorelines around the world and found synthetic microfibres everywhere, but in greatest concentrations near sewage outflows. He calculated that these fibres account for 85% of the human-made material on the shoreline.

The Plymouth University research team compared the shedding of microfibres from different fabrics. Acrylic was shown to be the worst offender, releasing nearly 730,000 tiny filaments in just one wash – almost one and a half times more than polyester and five times more than polyester-cotton blend."

(Choice)

"Sea life and birds die from eating it (plastic) or getting entangled in it. Some of the plastics will also bind with industrial chemicals that have polluted oceans for decades, raising concerns that toxins can make their way into our food chain." [www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org]

Be part of the solution and REDUCE your plastic consumption.

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